Meet the Brothers

 

 

 

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  • Joe Flowers
  • Caleb Musgrave
  • John Campbell
  • Mikhail Merkurieff
  • Norseman
Joe Flowers
Joe Flowers

Joe Flowers

Yo! My name is Joe Flowers. I live in the mountains of North Carolina, awaiting the cold until my scaly and insect friends emerge. Following my love for animals and the outdoors, I got a B.S. in Zoology from NC State with a minor and concentration in Entomology.  In the past, I worked for NC State in the Department of Entomology, doing field work, while rigorously practicing bushcraft skills while learning the secrets of wildlife and nature as best as I could.  In pursuit of my passions such as reptiles, amphibians, machetes, and bugs, I have traveled from the deserts of Utah all the way down to Peru in search of bushcraft skills, friendly people, and not so friendly creepy crawlies.

I also write professionally for many outdoor and nature magazines including Tactical Knives, Backpacker Magazine, Self Reliance Illustrated, Swat Magazine, and Woodsmonkey.com, and I am on the Equip2Endure podcast.

    I also; design and consult for knife companies both in the US and internationally, identify invasive insects, hunt for snakes and assist with reptile and amphibian related research projects and make videos on the side for fun.  I also work at a non-profit center -when I am not writing- where I teach survival classes, fitness, martial arts, and coordinate youth activities for my community to inspire kids to get outside, with the help of my dog Sheila. I also have an affinity for Godzilla movies

Caleb Musgrave
Caleb Musgrave

Caleb Musgrave

Hi there! My name is Caleb, though lots of folks call me Oz. I am a man of Ojibway tribal heritage,and have spent well over half of my  lifetime focusing on one aspect; to live in the wilderness indefinitely. My passion for wilderness self reliance and the primitive arts has led me to earn the role of Aboriginal Archeology Liaison for my native community in central Ontario Canada. Outside of digging in the dirt, I have been teaching for my entire adult life the skills needed to not just survive in the Boreal forests of Canada (the third largest ecosystem in the world), but to thrive within it. Trained by some of Canada’s leading wilderness experts, and with a background under the tutelage of Native elders and woodsmen since childhood, My experience in the Canadian wilderness is -in many people’s opinions-  truly exceptional.

My written work can be found inside Self-Reliance Illustrated, and websites such as the well respected Wild Wood Survival.com, and CanadianBushcraft.ca. I have been featured in detailed web-documentaries on subjects as varied as tracking, trapping, and Native history. My company, Canadian Bushcraft was featured in the Canadian national newspaper, The Globe and Mail. I have been a presenter at Ontario’s Harvest Gathering, teaching everything from bone tools, to firing pottery. I have also had the honour of being a Key-Note speaker at Headwater’s Gathering (Headwaters and Harvest are the only two public wilderness skills gatherings in Ontario Canada), lecturing about First Nation’s history in Ontario.

    When not training students of all ages, writing articles or working on archeological sites, I can often be found with stone aged weapons stalking wildlife in the moonlight. That or listening to some loud music while making weird things in my backyard.

“Back from the Wilderness. Back to the B.S.”- Caleb

John Campbell
John Campbell

John “Arizona Bushman”Campbell

Whats up! Some people now me as Arizona Bushman. I am a former desert survival instructor from Arizona. I have been into wilderness survival since the age of 8. I grew up in Oklahoma in a small town called Holsum Valley and during heavy rains and ice storms My family and I would be trapped for weeks at a time. Hunting, fishing, trapping, and gardening became a way of life for us. We would even raise our own food animals for sustainment during these hard times. From 11 years old to well into My teens I spent a lot of time in the Boy Scouts and the Explorer Scouts. Before and After graduating from high school in 1995 and spending some years undertaking survival skills in hostile environments, I decided to move to Arizona where I attended Cody Lundins Aboriginal Living Skills School at Yavapai college. I have been practicing desert survival skills and Primitive skills ever since, actively teaching survival since 2004. I have also worked with names like Ron Hood to film a pilot episode for the History channel.  At this current time, I design knives for various companies and I was also featured in the November 2011 issue of Tactical Knives Magazine. One of my favorite hobbies is to handle and photograph rattlesnakes and other reptiles and amphibians. I study native plants of the Southwest region and have been doing so for over 12 years. I have been told in the past I have a severe addiction to extremely spicy food and zombie films that may just require an intervention.

I have written a total of 3 books. These are called the Complete Survival in the Southwest, The Bushmans Guide to Field Medicine, and The Bushmans Guide to Tools and Gear. Among other things I have completed are the designs of the Saguaro Survival Knife, The High Desert Survival Knife, The Southwest Hunter and Trapper Knives, The Pro Tool Apache Bolo and SPCSE. I am also part of required learning for secondary school children all over the world where I am featured on the I Science Students Learning DVD. Feel Free to check out my new knife design the JULU.

Update: I have made an appearance on Discovery Canada’s Daily Planet. I was featured on their Survive This Week.  Click here to see this clip. I have also finished my books Survival in the Southwest and Memoirs of a Bushman. Currently working on one more!


Always a student never a master- John Campbell

Mikhail with Antlers
Mikhail Merkurieff

Mikhail Merkurieff

Heya! My name is Mikhail. I spent the first part of my life in Puerto Rico. Though I moved to the states at a very you age the time I spent in PR had a profound impact on my life. My uncles would frequently take me fishing, hunting, and foraging. From jungle to sea I found great pleasure in utilizing what nature provided. And because my uncles usually left the job of cleaning and sometimes cooking our catch to me, I became good at it. Machete in hand, I began exploring and loving the outdoors from an early age.

With many moves growing up, I experienced life in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, where my passion for the wilds grew with my training in the skills. I even managed to become an Eagle Scout. From fire starting in the wet and cold, to hunting big game with bow and gun, my love for the wilderness expanded far beyond just childhood fun. I’ve since spent time in the Canadian Rockies, Mission Mountains in Montana, the deserts and high mountains of Arizona, New Mexico, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah, I even spent a week on an uninhabited Island living well off of the seafood I pulled from the water and rocks. So long as I had my machete and canteen I was good to go.

Finally, I am an insufferable tinker. My friends call me a monkey with a screw driver. If it isn’t broke, just give me more time. Afterwards, however, I’ll make it better. I’ve modified or built just about everything in my kit. Some innovations, like my Emberlit Stove, have gone beyond my pack and are now popular around the world. It makes sense that I have such a fascination with the ingenuity our ancestors displayed with their tools and traps. As I am unsatisfied with superficial understanding my study of new skills borderlines on the obsessive. There are nuances and local adaptations of skills that simply aren’t in the survival guides. These are what I strive to master then share with others. Watch me sling a rock or spin a coal with the hand drill and you’ll see what I mean.

Norseman
Norseman

Norseman

The Saga of Norseman
In days of yore a youth was born, of sturdy strength and sturdy mind. As the gods looked on in wonder at their creation, and with their infinite wisdom they dropped him directly in between two sisters. And on this day hell on earth began.
I was born and lived my early childhood in Augusta Georgia, until around the age of eight my family relocated to Southern Michigan. My father was a genius mechanic and hunter, my mother was a prison guard in Jackson. As a child I found that my two sisters shared one great passion in life. That passion was the endless torture of their only brother. In time I found that the only place that I could get any peace was alone in the wilderness. I learned to hunt, first with a bow and later with rifles and shotguns. It seemed that I spent all of my free time alone in the woods of Michigan. Of course winter was inevitable and eventually I learned to cope with the bitter, wet, cold conditions as well as anyone could expect too. This passion for the woods grew as I grew, and blossomed when I started to understand the things that were going on around me. I spent much of my free time teaching myself to track and recognize the natural resources that were there in abundance. Keep in mind that this was not survival, I didn’t even know what that was; for me it just was the way things were. It seemed natural and instinctive so I never found a reason to put a label on it. In my youth I explored many avenues that would today be considered modern survival, like raising rabbits and planting a garden. I was not raised like this; we were like any other modern family at the time. It seemed to me to be the thing to do, and although my friends didn’t quite get it, they didn’t give me any flack over it either.
I was as much of a hell raiser as any teen, I suppose, but was always just about a half step ahead of the authorities and never incurred any real charges, other than one for hunting without a license when I was fourteen. So I continued to dodge the bullets and eventually matured to a point that I would have to soon figure out a plan for life. My plan was to join the military and go out in a blaze of glory. I sure do miss the illusions of youth. I realized the first part of that dream when I enlisted in the Marine Corps immediately after graduation in 1993. Before Yule of that year I was a US Marine attending the School of Infantry. I loved it, there was nothing like being a grunt. In March of 1995 I found myself in the New Port of Mogadishu Somalia, This is where I had my first combat engagement and the realization that “this is nothing like the movies” This is stupid and there are far too many rules. Never the less I returned home and progressed through my Marine Corps career.
Throughout the years I have had the opportunity to attend many courses and training across the globe. I could never seem to get enough training, so the next logical step was to go to snipers. I attended the sniper indoctrination with 14 other hopefuls and only two of us made the selection. Soon after indoctrination I was off to sniper school where I spent the next ten and a half weeks, in a state of mental and physical exhaustion like I had never known possible. I was one of the fortunate few that graduated the course on the first attempt and returned to my platoon in the Fleet Marine Force. Throughout my tour with the platoon I attended and graduated many courses to include: Urban Sniper, Urban R&S, Advanced Sniper, Sniper Employment Officer, and Mountain Survival. I had forgotten how good it feels to accomplish wilderness living tasks, so now my flame was rekindled.
After a couple successful deployments, I applied for an instructor’s position at the First Marine Division, Scout Sniper Basic Course. I was accepted and immediately began to re design the survival and combat tracking programs. The new programs greatly increased the field craft portion of the course and I eventually became the primary instructor for field craft. After my tour was complete I rotated back to the FMF and took over a sniper platoon for a couple more deployments. At this time I was becoming well connected in the survival community and was really enjoying the job that I had. Eventually working with other sniper platoon sergeants we started a pilot program to get David Scott-Dolelan From TTOS (Former Rhodesian SAS, Selous Scout) out to Camp Pendleton to teach a few select Individuals the art of Combat Tracking, some of which were my former students at the school house. The program was a grand success and we set up a second one, this time I was an assistant instructor. The program eventually evolved into the Combat Hunter Program that is still in use in the Marine Corps today. Upon the end of my rotation with this sniper platoon I received orders to the Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport California.
When I checked I inquired about instructing the Mountain Survival course that I attended many years before. I was informed that the program was decommissioned. I worked with the SNCOIC of the Formal Schools and rebuilt the program from the ground up. I secured a contract to have Ron Hood out on the mountain to train my instructors. These guys were already proficient survivalists so the goal with Ron was to teach them how to teach survival. It was an instructor course like none other. During the ten day course, range control tried many times to have us come down off the mountain because a winter storm was approaching and we would be on our own, with no extract capabilities other than skis and sleds. We stuck it out and the experience was epic. Ron Hood proclaimed that I was among the top woodsmen that he has ever had in the field, in his over 40 year’s experience, what a great honor it was to hear that come from the Woodsmaster. We became even better friends and I owe him a debt of gratitude for opening many doors for me. The survival program flourished despite the fact that my cadre was also responsible for the Mountain Sniper Course. Both programs benefited from each other.

During my time on the mountain I was fortunate enough to attend the summer and winter mountain leaders courses focusing on the basic mountain guide skills in that environment with a military twist on it. Additionally I attended higher levels of training in Telemark skiing, tactical rope suspension and systems for rescue, alpine operations with glacier travel, crevasse rescue and ice climbing. I graduated Rock II training hosted at Lovers Leap California focusing on two man teams, multi pitch climbs, up to the 5.8, 5.9 rating YS. In preparation for the pilot course of the survival program I was given the opportunity to attend a two part course in Elverum Norway, at the Norwegian School of Winter Warfare. The International SERE Instructors Course, summer and winter certifications. By far that was one of the most challenging courses that I have ever attended.

By this time my quest for survival has become an unquenchable thirst. So I created my own system of training called Survivology 101 and the associate blog www.survivology101.blogspot.com that teaches the principals and the science behind the skills, focusing far beyond the cool and sexy of survival. I have continued my association with Hoods Woods as a staff writer for Survival Quarterly Magazine, and other projects as I am needed. I have recently become a member of the Brothers of Bushcraft where our simple purpose is to teach the skills to any and all that are interested. My continuing goal is to teach and preach the survival arts until such time as I retire from the Marine Corps. Then I suppose that ill have to get a real job and who knows where that path will lead? In the interim, I will continue to expand my knowledge base, turn others on to the wonderful outdoors, continue on various conservation efforts, and continue in my role as an advocate for veterans and veteran’s rights. I will continue to develop myself and take on new and exciting projects as the opportunities present themselves. Currently I am stationed on the Gulf Coast and I am getting acquainted with the flora and fauna that inhabit the woodlands and the swamps in my new AO.

Over the years my students in the art of survival and tracking have been, Sierra club members, Special Forces personnel, Snipers, Recon, Force Recon, MARSOC, Police and TLA’s (three letter agencies), border patrol, foreign special operators and many other civilian and military instructors and personnel from around the globe. I have instructed at Survival gatherings and hosted workshops, and lectures, and have been assigned to groups to update military survival manuals and develop curriculum for survival education and training. And I am only getting started. Be Well, Norseman

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3 Responses to Meet the Brothers

  1. I’d be interested in joining your group. I’m buying your new knife design this week. Excellent work and I can’t wait to test it out. And I got to say the price is a helluva deal for a TOPS knife. Look forward to chatting with you guys!

  2. Hi guy’s,I know some of you from the Hoodlum’s forum,Mikhail I spend time with last year at the End Of The World.Now,I must say—WHY DID YOU DESIGN THAT KNIFE,don’t you know how weak I am.I tried to resist,I did.But today something took hold of me,and I ordered one.SAME ON YOU.look what you made me do———-Your all evil———-Evil I say

  3. Hey I just wanted to say that I have had the BOB fieldcraft knife for months now and its my favorite blade and I own some really nice ones. Keep up the good work guys! Oh and FYI I run SIGMA 3 Survival School and do bushcraft, survival and tactical skills for a living. So when I say I really like a blade I don’t do it casually. Top Notch!